our journey

tastefullyoffensive:

[incidentalcomics]

talkingtomeaboutauthority:

Roses are red

Violets are blue

image

image

(via utopia-shangrila)

tako-dna:

Tribute “How to train your Dragon” - What if Hiccup and Toothless had met earlier ?

tako-dna:

Tribute “How to train your Dragon” - What if Hiccup and Toothless had met earlier ?

(via utopia-shangrila)

thottie:

srslywhocares:

Let’s show up uninvited to a public place! #anarchy

2001 is sacred

(Source: suqmydiqtbh, via ruinedchildhood)

“I love coffee. I sometimes get excited at night thinking of the coffee I’ll get to drink in the morning. Coffee is reason to wake up. There are other reasons, of course. But coffee is the incentive, at the very least.”

—   Annie Clark (via sufjand)

(via fishy)

Ever finished a book? I mean, truly finished one? Cover to cover. Closed the spine with that slow awakening that comes with reentering consciousness?

You take a breath, deep from the bottom of your lungs and sit there. Book in both hands, your head staring down at the cover, back page or wall in front of you.

You’re grateful, thoughtful, pensive. You feel like a piece of you was just gained and lost. You’ve just experienced something deep, something intimate… Full from the experience, the connection, the richness that comes after digesting another soul.

[…]

It’s no surprise that readers are better people. Having experienced someone else’s life through abstract eyes, they’ve learned what it’s like to leave their bodies and see the world through other frames of reference. They have access to hundreds of souls, and the collected wisdom of all them.

—   

Beautiful read on why readers are, “scientifically,” the best people to date

Perhaps Kafka’s timeless contention that books are "the axe for the frozen sea inside us" applies equally to the frozen sea between us. 

(via explore-blog)

(via teachingliteracy)

thebloggerbloggerfun:

Just tried Turkish Delight for the first time. 

It was good, but not “Sell out my family to the White Queen” good. 

(via englishmajorhumor)

literarynerd:

Pride & Prejudice in 100 Seconds.

(via englishmajorhumor)

glorfindely:

when i’m out with my family and i see a book store

image

(Source: thrannduil, via englishmajorhumor)

My Reactions to the 7 goals for Germany

nutelladisney:

  1. GOOOOOOAAAAAL!!!!!! YEEESSSS! HARD PARTY ROCKIN!!
  2. BOOOOOM!!!!!
  3. I’m so proud of you germany!
  4. Wow, ok.
  5. ….
  6. ……………
  7. WAT  imageREALLY?!
theparisreview:

Faulkner and Hemingway had a famously snippy rapport—Will was all like, “He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary,” and Ernie was all like, “If you have to write the longest sentence in the world to give a book distinction, the next thing you should hire Bill Veek [sic] and use midgets”—which makes Faulkner’s one-paragraph review of The Old Man and the Sea all the more surprising in its candor and courteousness. “Time may show it to be the best single piece of any of us, I mean his and my contemporaries.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Faulkner and Hemingway had a famously snippy rapport—Will was all like, “He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary,” and Ernie was all like, “If you have to write the longest sentence in the world to give a book distinction, the next thing you should hire Bill Veek [sic] and use midgets”—which makes Faulkner’s one-paragraph review of The Old Man and the Sea all the more surprising in its candor and courteousness. “Time may show it to be the best single piece of any of us, I mean his and my contemporaries.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

“The problem with reading a good book is that you want to finish the book but you don’t want to finish the book.”

—   (via cup-of-letters)

(Source: unfamousbee, via cup-of-letters)